Tuesday, February 23, 2010

My four-legged neighbors...

as promised.

Oh, and as an aside, I WILL be getting internet service in the next few weeks, so hopefully my blogging will pick up. Then again, who knows? ;)

Here's the flock of sheep that lives in my back yard. Tucker delights in charging the electric fence, stiff-legged and barking, whenever they happen to be close by.

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Here's the mama sheep (or "ewe", lol) with her two surviving lambs. I believe I mentioned she had triplets but the runt died the first night. See the size disparity between the two remaining lambs? Amazing!

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I still can't figure out what breed of sheep they are, though I've been googling like mad. I suppose I could just ask my roommate, but what fun is that?

Here are the asses of a herd of cattle that live next door to the east of me, they're gathered around a giant bale of hay. And what's with these huge, rolled-up hay bales? I thought hay came in square bales you could pick up and sling onto the bed of a pick-up truck?

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Here's Bucky the Goat, my neighbor to the West.

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And finally, here's a herd of miniature horses, whom I pass every time I drive into town. They're still shaggy with their winter coats, and I think they're ADORABLE. I squee every time I pass them. :)

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What do y'all think of my brainstorm of breeding mini-mules, using miniature mares and a teeny-weeny donkey? Brilliance or folly? I think I could make a mint...

21 comments:

JohnMXL said...

Big round bales are about saving labor in a farming operation.

Round bales store better outdoors than square bales and require less manual handling for the amount of feed value.

Back in the day, when my Dad was a boy, there were lots of young men (and no doubt a few young women - farm girls are pretty AND tough) who earned good money during the summer picking up baled hay and putting it in barns and outdoor stacks.

As we advance thru the years to today we find a smaller workforce willing to spend hot summer days in airless barns and shadeless hayfields and fewer farms small enough to exist on the amount of hay that can be reasonably put up and fed out in small bales.

Big round bales can be handled with powered equipment, stored easily, fed easily and preserve the feed value of the hay.

Sorry for long reply...your question triggered a nice stroll down memory lane.

Christina LMT said...

John, no apologies necessary, your comment was exactly what I was hoping for: information! Now if you could only tell me what breed of sheep my roommate raises...

Rick Ratayczak said...

Breeding small asses will only make Sir Mix A Lot jealous, because he likes hig butts and he cannot lie.

Christina LMT said...

Good point, Rick...except I'll be breeding MULES, using an ass. So Sir Mix a Lot should be quite content.

Old NFO said...

Are you sure you're not living at the McDonald place??? :-) Re the shetland ponies, those are the most obnoxious little beasts I've ever had the displeasure of encountering... mini-mules? Distilled stubbornness and less pulling power :-) I love it LOL

Christina LMT said...

Old NFO, and I didn't even take pics of the regular horses, rabbits, or chickens! Those are not ponies, btw. They are definitely miniature horses, an entirely different beast (literally).Ponies are nasty, indeed. And I speak from experience!
I lurve the idea of mini-mules, you could train them to pull carts, or something!

10% said...

Based on just pictures I think the sheep are American Blackbelly.

Christina LMT said...

10%, that was my guess, too! I'll go google some more images and double-check, THEN I'll ask my roomie. :D

Buckskins Rule said...

Christina, miniature horses may be appear adorable to the naked eye, but make no mistake: they are evil little bastards. Spawn of the devil, even. Besides, what good is a horse you can't ride? Stick with the full size ones.

Christina LMT said...

LOL, methinks you might be just a little biased, Sir!

Miniature horses cannot be ridden, but neither can they throw and trample their riders. Or chomp on them with giant teeth.

JUST KIDDING! I love full-sized horses, too, and I'd have pics of them as well, but had a car behind me and couldn't stop at that time. :)

be603 said...

"distilled stubborness"

LOL!

Bag Blog said...

I just dropped by from Buck's blog after reading that you are a Texas girl now. Don't know why I haven't been by to say hello before now - bein' neighbors and all. I live across the river, but I'm a Texas girl born and bred. Anyway, you have a great blog. Welcome to farm life.

Christina LMT said...

be603, maybe that's what I could call my business!

Bag Blog, thank you! I do love it here so far, except for the LOVELY weather we've been having. {/sarcasm}

Bob S. said...

Christina,

My co-worker who raises sheep as a hobby also confirms they are American Black Bellies.

Sometimes called Barbadoes

Christina LMT said...

Yup, thanks, Bob! I do believe that the Barbados Blackbelly sheep is a different breed, though. Closely related, naturally. ;)

Buck said...

Here's Bucky the Goat, my neighbor to the West.

Oh, NOES! Now I'm a goat?

Lotsa cool stuff in this post and comments. Makes my day.

Christina LMT said...

Hey, at least I didn't say OLD goat! ;)

dick said...

Well damn! You are alive.

Christina LMT said...

I am, I am!
And next week or so I should finally have internet! :)

phlegmfatale said...

thanks for the vicarious thrill of seeing all your local livestock!

Christina LMT said...

You're welcome, Phlegmmy!